What’s the best way to maintain physical endurance once you’ve reached your 40s?

May 26th, 2014
Greg Bennett 2-2

In part two of our interview with Team Ribose triathlete Greg Bennett, he discloses his personal strategies for staying in competition-ready shape.

BLS: By the time people hit 40, the aches and pains start to become more of a daily reminder of their age. How have you countered that?

GB: The key for aging well into the 40s is to keep moving. The body is giving more and more hints that it would like to slow down. It is a little harder to walk first thing in the morning and the recovery time does take longer. Intense workouts are fewer and further apart. The intense phases of training blocks during the year are getting shorter. Ribose helps reduce muscle recovery time as well as pain, so if it’s not part of your regimen yet, you should consider it.

BLS: Are you saying that it’s okay to give into the temptation to slow down?

GB: I’m saying that there is still tremendous potential for the body. The aerobic engine is still functioning at its highest and the strength is still in the body. The good news is, the work we did in our 20s and 30s is still in us. If we can just keep moving we don’t have to work as hard as we did in our 20s and 30s to be successful. We just need to manage what we have.

BLS: Do you have any specific tips?

GB: Don’t go searching for too much. The areas where we need to be very careful are the higher intensity workouts. Searching for too much speed or power in our 40s can be dangerous. These intense workouts take more finesse in our 40s. I use Phil Dumphy’s quote from the TV series Modern Family when doing more intense work, “smooth is fast and fast is smooth”.

More time is also needed for warming the body up. I now warm up at a much slower pace. If we listen our bodies, they will tell us when they’re ready to get going. I’ve gone out for runs where I’ve started so slowly that walkers go straight on by. But, I listen to some music and just keep moving. Ten minutes later I realize, wow I’m actually moving okay. The body will slowly let go.

BLS: Any final advice for people in their 40s who haven’t maintained a fitness routine their entire adult lives, as you have?

GB: Do something every day. Even 10 minutes of activity is better than nothing at all. If you take a day off, it only makes the next day you start back much harder. If you’ve had some time off, don’t stress. Start back slowly. Begin week one with 5-10 minutes every day and build the weeks gradually. Within two months, you may find doing 30 minutes every day is not so bad.

Remember, the only thing we truly own for our entire lives is our own bodies. The better we look after it, the better it will perform, it’s worth the investment.

 

A passion for fitness: Team Ribose triathlete Greg Bennett reveals endurance tips for each decade of your life

May 19th, 2014
GregBennett

Olympic triathlete Greg Bennett has said that taking Bioenergy Ribose gives him the energy and quick recovery he needs to keep up with athletes half is age. His is an inspiring career, and in part one of this interview with Bioenergy Life Science (BLS), he shares more advice for staying in good shape throughout each stage of your life.

BLS: Why were you so excited to talk about fitness, and the physical changes as we age?

GB: I was anxious because most people talking about ‘ages and stages” begin by discussing worn-out joints and the like. I want to start with the one thing that I believe leaves us first as we age. That thing is Passion. Once the passion to keep the routine, to do the work and be excited about the performance leaves us, everything else will also leave.

BLS: How has passion factored into your successes?

GB: Keeping the passion alive is critical to keeping the body performing physically, mentally and emotionally at its best. Finding a passion, and fueling that passion constantly will make the physical changes to the body as you age much easier to manage. Passion is the one thing that I believe separates me from all the other aging athletes. I’m a 42-year-old professional triathlete, competing for my 29th year in Triathlon, 21 of those years as a professional. I am still winning major events. I’ve had to adjust my training as I age, but this adjustment has never been difficult so long as the flame is still alight.

BLS: What’s one of the biggest misconceptions about how our bodies respond to training as we age?

GB: I’ve often laughed when I’ve heard someone say, “I’ve finally figured out the right training routine.” I laugh, because they have figured the right training routine for today. One month, six months, a year or two from now, the body will not respond the same way it did when we were younger. We are always changing. The decisions we made yesterday will always effect today and tomorrow.

BLS: What should people in their 20s understand about training and endurance?

GB: The body is still making changes after the teenage years. Strength, power and speed all come pretty easily. The body recovers quickly, ready to take on the next day again and again. The aerobic engine builds and the body becomes more efficient at the movement patterns that are being constantly trained into it. Injuries still happen, but the body’s ability to recover quickly in its 20s allows us to get going with less time on the sidelines.

BLS: What happens once you hit your thirties?

GB: I call this time the “Golden 30s”. In an endurance sport like triathlon, the 30s are the golden age for peak performance, so long as you keep the passion alive. The body is still fast, strong and powerful. But now we add more efficiency of movement and the aerobic engine is far more developed. Looking back at my career, my 30s were when I had my greatest successes: Winning the World Triathlon series twice in my early 30s, the world’s richest triathlon series purse three times in my mid-30s, and the world’s richest one-day prize purse at 39. Obviously this doesn’t just happen. I believe I’ve trained harder than anyone else on the planet. I’ve backed up this training with loads of recovery work. (Massage three to four times a week, chiropractors once a week, and loads of time using foam rollers etc.) And of course, Bioenergy Ribose to help speed muscle recovery. Most importantly, I’ve kept my passion alive.

 

Bioenergy Life Science booth was the place to be during Engredea 2014

March 17th, 2014
Bryce at Bioenergy Booth

It was nonstop action during Engredea 2014, as health and nutrition industry experts from around the country converged at our booth to learn more about Bioenergy Ribose. Among the many highlights were the book signings by Jacob Teitelbaum, MD and the special appearance by Olympic medalist Susan Francia. We were also thrilled when alternative health expert Dr. Bryce Wylde interviewed Dr. Teitelbaum about the link between ribose, energy and fatigue.

Dr. Teitelbaum is a board certified internist and nationally known expert in the fields of chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, sleep and pain. Wylde, who is a frequent guest on The Dr. Oz Show, travels the world in search of beneficial natural ingredients so we were excited that he spent so much time at our booth. We’ll be sharing excerpts from this video interview here, as they become available.

Bioenergy Life Science will exhibit at several more events this year, including:

• BevNet Live: May 14-15, New York

• IFT: June 22-24, Louisiana

• SupplySide West: October 8-9, Nevada

• Hi Europe: December 2-4, The Netherlands

• BevNet Live: December 8-9, California

If you are an industry member, please stop by our booth during one or more of these events. And here’s the good news if you are a consumer: With all the excitement generated by Bioenergy Ribose, you’re likely to find it even more widely available – and in new lines of products – in the near future.

 

Stop by Engredea booth #317 to meet Susan Francia and Jacob Teitelbaum

February 27th, 2014
engredea

Everyone is hearing the buzz about energy products, and Bioenergy Life Science, Inc. (BLS) is the only provider of the pure and patented Bioenergy Ribose that is sweetening the conversations. Just ask Olympic gold medalist Susan Francia how Bioenergy Ribose safely helps her achieve sustained energy and reduce muscle soreness. She’ll be in the BLS Engredea booth #317 on Sunday showing off her Olympic gold medals. Or chat with Dr. Jacob Teitelbaum during his book signings in the booth about his groundbreaking ribose research.

Already popular in many beverages and supplements, all-natural Bioenergy Ribose can improve the nutritional profile and benefit claims of food and beverage applications. Attendees will be invited to taste the energy-sustaining samples, which this year will include Zipp Foods’ new Energy Mint, Good Cacao Superfood chocolate, and a caffeine-ribose beverage prototype.

Celebrity appearances

Best-selling author Jacob Teitelbaum, MD, is a board certified internist and nationally known expert in the fields of chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, sleep and pain. On Friday and Saturday from 1-2 p.m., he will be available to talk about the link between ribose, energy and fatigue. He’ll also be signing copies of his newest book, “The Fatigue and Fibromyalgia Solution” as well as copies of his popular book, “From Fatigued to Fantastic! A Proven Program to Regain Vibrant Health, Based on a New Scientific Study Showing Effective Treatment for Chronic Fatigue and Fibromyalgia.”

Two-time Olympic champion, world champion and world-record holder in rowing Susan Francia will be in the BLS booth all day on Sunday. A two-year Team Ribose member, Francia says competitive racing is rigorous, and that Bioenergy Ribose helps her recover after the race and feel fresh for the next one.

Stop by Engredea booth #317 to learn how products formulated with ribose help to improve energy levels, fight fatigue and boost exercise recovery.

 

Ribose helps neurosurgeon Joseph Maroon finish his fifth Ironman World Championship Triathlon

October 22nd, 2013
Iron man

Congratulations to neurosurgeon, nutrition and fitness expert Joseph Maroon, MD on completing his fifth Hawaiian Ironman World Championship Triathlon. Regarded as one of, if not the most, grueling athletic competitions in the world, it punishes competitors with a 2.4-mile open water swim, a 112-mile bike ride through the Hawaiian lava fields, and a full 26.2-mile marathon. Dr. Maroon’s time was 16:03:48.

As an experienced triathlete as well as team neurosurgeon for the Pittsburgh Steelers among many other professional achievements, Maroon knows how to prepare for an event of this magnitude. Before departing for Hawaii, he noted in his blog, “As usual I’ve included several turkey sandwiches and my specially formulated drink bottles. I plan to include D-ribose resveratrol … to help me get through the race.”

After the race Maroon commented, “I used (ribose) in my water bottles for the run and bike, and truly believe it made a difference in my endurance. My slow time in the marathon was due to a bad knee not my conditioning.”

 

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