What’s the best way to maintain physical endurance once you’ve reached your 40s?

May 26th, 2014
Greg Bennett 2-2

In part two of our interview with Team Ribose triathlete Greg Bennett, he discloses his personal strategies for staying in competition-ready shape.

BLS: By the time people hit 40, the aches and pains start to become more of a daily reminder of their age. How have you countered that?

GB: The key for aging well into the 40s is to keep moving. The body is giving more and more hints that it would like to slow down. It is a little harder to walk first thing in the morning and the recovery time does take longer. Intense workouts are fewer and further apart. The intense phases of training blocks during the year are getting shorter. Ribose helps reduce muscle recovery time as well as pain, so if it’s not part of your regimen yet, you should consider it.

BLS: Are you saying that it’s okay to give into the temptation to slow down?

GB: I’m saying that there is still tremendous potential for the body. The aerobic engine is still functioning at its highest and the strength is still in the body. The good news is, the work we did in our 20s and 30s is still in us. If we can just keep moving we don’t have to work as hard as we did in our 20s and 30s to be successful. We just need to manage what we have.

BLS: Do you have any specific tips?

GB: Don’t go searching for too much. The areas where we need to be very careful are the higher intensity workouts. Searching for too much speed or power in our 40s can be dangerous. These intense workouts take more finesse in our 40s. I use Phil Dumphy’s quote from the TV series Modern Family when doing more intense work, “smooth is fast and fast is smooth”.

More time is also needed for warming the body up. I now warm up at a much slower pace. If we listen our bodies, they will tell us when they’re ready to get going. I’ve gone out for runs where I’ve started so slowly that walkers go straight on by. But, I listen to some music and just keep moving. Ten minutes later I realize, wow I’m actually moving okay. The body will slowly let go.

BLS: Any final advice for people in their 40s who haven’t maintained a fitness routine their entire adult lives, as you have?

GB: Do something every day. Even 10 minutes of activity is better than nothing at all. If you take a day off, it only makes the next day you start back much harder. If you’ve had some time off, don’t stress. Start back slowly. Begin week one with 5-10 minutes every day and build the weeks gradually. Within two months, you may find doing 30 minutes every day is not so bad.

Remember, the only thing we truly own for our entire lives is our own bodies. The better we look after it, the better it will perform, it’s worth the investment.

 

A passion for fitness: Team Ribose triathlete Greg Bennett reveals endurance tips for each decade of your life

May 19th, 2014
GregBennett

Olympic triathlete Greg Bennett has said that taking Bioenergy Ribose gives him the energy and quick recovery he needs to keep up with athletes half is age. His is an inspiring career, and in part one of this interview with Bioenergy Life Science (BLS), he shares more advice for staying in good shape throughout each stage of your life.

BLS: Why were you so excited to talk about fitness, and the physical changes as we age?

GB: I was anxious because most people talking about ‘ages and stages” begin by discussing worn-out joints and the like. I want to start with the one thing that I believe leaves us first as we age. That thing is Passion. Once the passion to keep the routine, to do the work and be excited about the performance leaves us, everything else will also leave.

BLS: How has passion factored into your successes?

GB: Keeping the passion alive is critical to keeping the body performing physically, mentally and emotionally at its best. Finding a passion, and fueling that passion constantly will make the physical changes to the body as you age much easier to manage. Passion is the one thing that I believe separates me from all the other aging athletes. I’m a 42-year-old professional triathlete, competing for my 29th year in Triathlon, 21 of those years as a professional. I am still winning major events. I’ve had to adjust my training as I age, but this adjustment has never been difficult so long as the flame is still alight.

BLS: What’s one of the biggest misconceptions about how our bodies respond to training as we age?

GB: I’ve often laughed when I’ve heard someone say, “I’ve finally figured out the right training routine.” I laugh, because they have figured the right training routine for today. One month, six months, a year or two from now, the body will not respond the same way it did when we were younger. We are always changing. The decisions we made yesterday will always effect today and tomorrow.

BLS: What should people in their 20s understand about training and endurance?

GB: The body is still making changes after the teenage years. Strength, power and speed all come pretty easily. The body recovers quickly, ready to take on the next day again and again. The aerobic engine builds and the body becomes more efficient at the movement patterns that are being constantly trained into it. Injuries still happen, but the body’s ability to recover quickly in its 20s allows us to get going with less time on the sidelines.

BLS: What happens once you hit your thirties?

GB: I call this time the “Golden 30s”. In an endurance sport like triathlon, the 30s are the golden age for peak performance, so long as you keep the passion alive. The body is still fast, strong and powerful. But now we add more efficiency of movement and the aerobic engine is far more developed. Looking back at my career, my 30s were when I had my greatest successes: Winning the World Triathlon series twice in my early 30s, the world’s richest triathlon series purse three times in my mid-30s, and the world’s richest one-day prize purse at 39. Obviously this doesn’t just happen. I believe I’ve trained harder than anyone else on the planet. I’ve backed up this training with loads of recovery work. (Massage three to four times a week, chiropractors once a week, and loads of time using foam rollers etc.) And of course, Bioenergy Ribose to help speed muscle recovery. Most importantly, I’ve kept my passion alive.

 

San Diego morning TV show features Olympic gold medalist’s fitness tips

May 13th, 2014
xetv miller blog picture

When two-time Olympic gold medalist Susan Francia visited San Diego Living, she brought the fitness essentials: two Olympic gold medals, recommendations for a morning fitness routine and Bioenergy Ribose. After flexing her rower’s biceps, she discussed some of the finer points of being a world-class athlete, including how she eats a whopping 4,000 calories each day and how ribose has a positive impact on her energy and muscle soreness. Encouraging viewers to cook their own meals – “It’s good to eat stuff that’s less processed”– Francia added that she takes ribose both in the morning and at night to maximize its benefits for her endurance and recovery. She then led the show’s host on a brief morning workout that combined jump squats, lunges and pushups. Francia also reminded viewers about the importance of staying hydrated.

 

 

Team Ribose’s Billy Demong reflects on his Olympics experience

April 28th, 2014
Billy Demong Bioenergy Ribose Olympics

What’s it like to train for the Winter Olympics? To compete as part of Team USA? Team Ribose member Billy Demong traveled to Sochi, Russia to represent the U.S. in the Nordic Combined events. He recently told Bioenergy Ribose about his experience.

“Being at the Olympics is not only a life goal, but it is a rare time in an athlete’s life where you get to prioritize feeling good,” he said. “The training is over. The peak has been attained. It is really about doing the little things each and every day that allow you to be and feel your very best.”

The Nordic Combined Team, along with the U.S Alpine Ski Team and the U.S. Snowboard Team, stayed at a hotel near the ski jumps. “We were a little spoiled. We had chefs from the U.S. Committee cooking for us, and a gym filled with everything we could want for a work out.”

But surprisingly, Demong did not spend most of his time training. “I trained a minimal amount in order to stay in peak condition. While that was less than two hours per day, nearly half of the training I did in Sochi was at maximal intensity. I spent a great deal of time doing contrast baths (hot/cold), stretching and relaxing. I know that sounds crazy, but at that level you are really trying to allow the years of training to reach the highest pinnacle by backing off.”

Demong’s preparation also extended to his diet. “I made very sure to stick to my nutritional routine. I took my full dose of Bioenergy Ribose, Beta-Alanine and other supplements to ensure I would not miss anything on race day. I have found that D-Ribose reduces my training fatigue and has really helped me gain an even keel in day-to-day recovery. That was certainly true at the Olympics. I felt my very best, I raced well and had I jumped a bit farther I know I would have been in podium contention.”

He explained why this consistency is important. “That’s the tough part of combined events, one discipline can set you up or take you out for another. Especially being in an outdoor sport like Nordic Combined, I have become used to (as much as one can) the reality that wind, snow, rain or another extraneous factor can severely influence performance. That’s why I choose to focus on the variables I can control, whether it be training, nutrition, equipment or something else.

“I know that I can bring my A-game on any day with the help of tried-and-true mental and physical routines. From experience, I know that the difference between 1st and 30th is far closer than what results will ever show.”

For Demong the highlight of the Olympics, in lieu of a medal, was spending time with his family. “The experiences of chasing my son around Russia, and enjoying dinner out with my wife, parents and sister, were really special. Having previously won a gold medal, I can honestly say two things:

1. I would change nothing about how I prepared. I felt amazing on competition day, and I know that mentally and physically I was in the right place.

2. Jumping on the bed with my son, Liam, after a disappointing finish felt nearly as good as winning and reminded me of what is truly important.

Bioenergy Ribose is proud of how Billy Demong represented the U.S. during the 2014 Winter Olympics. We look forward to cheering him on during his next round of competitions.

 

What’s in JJ Virgin’s gym bag?

April 2nd, 2014
Sport bag

It’s no surprise that Bioenergy Ribose is a must-have in JJ Virgin’s gym bag. This fitness and nutrition expert, who is also a New York Times best-selling author, has embraced a natural approach to health throughout her high-profile career.

“Bioenergy Ribose helps muscles recover faster, so there’s less stiffness and soreness. When I work out, I bring my Virgin Diet All-in-One protein powder with a teaspoon of ribose in a blender bottle. I just add water for a great recovery shake.” She adds that if you are traveling, you can easily pre-sort this combo in little plastic bags.

Everyone from Dr. Phil to high-performance athletes and A-list celebrities have relied on JJ’s expertise. A board certified nutrition specialist, she is also board certified in holistic nutrition and a certified nutrition and fitness specialist.

The contents of JJ’s gym bag also include:
• Dehydrated or low-roasted almonds to stave off hunger. “If you don’t like almonds, you can substitute other nuts.”
• Rhodiola rosea: “This helps fight stress and fatigue. It’s a great workout booster!”
• A super-light pair of Nike or New Balance gym shoes.
• Lululemon workout pants. “I prefer lightweight clothing that doesn’t weigh me down as I’m working out.”

And JJ’s best training tip? “Consider burst training. Scheduling an hour for aerobics class in your already-loaded schedule only creates more stress for both your mind and body. According to Charles Poliquin, aerobic exercise raises cortisol (your stress hormone), accelerates aging and lowers testosterone. Burst training is the efficient, effective antidote to an hours-long gym routine that you can do in just minutes. I love to combine it with weight resistance for the two best kinds of exercise on the planet. You can get both with my 4 x 4 Workout, which fits into your busiest schedule: You can knock the whole thing out in just 15 minutes, three times a week.”

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