Bioenergy Ribose makes the Mount Kilimanjaro climb with Dr. Maroon

February 13th, 2014
Mount Kilimanjaro

When renowned neurosurgeon and athlete Dr. Joseph Maroon began planning his climbing expedition of Mount Kilimanjaro, he was certain that his equipment must include Bioenergy Ribose. A sports fitness expert, Maroon knows that D-Ribose will help his muscles recover faster from the extreme exertion. It will also help to reduce stiffness and soreness. “D-Ribose will be in my water bottles,” he confirms.

Maroon is participating as the medical advisor for the first-ever climb of Mount Kilimanjaro by 11 amputees, organized by the Live Free Foundation. The climb will begin on February 20, and the group will attempt to reach the summit in five days. At 19,341 feet above sea level, Mount Kilimanjaro is Africa’s highest peak.

Bioenergy Ribose has been Maroon’s ‘secret weapon’ during past athletic feats including his participation in Iron Man Triathlons.

 

Bioenergy Ribose featured in Muscle & Fitness magazine article

January 20th, 2014
Playing in the park

When board-certified nutritionist and nationally known fitness expert Jonny Bowden, Ph.D., CNS, was asked to write an article advising readers how to get more energy, he made sure to include Bioenergy Ribose. In his article “Simple Steps to Power Up Your Energy Reserves”, Bowden explains that, “Ribose is not like rollover minutes. You can’t store it up. If you’re doing something strenuous that requires a lot of exertion, you’ll need a lot of it, maybe more than your body can churn out right away.”

Bowden, the best-selling author of 14 books on health, healing, food and longevity, added that, “Bioenergy Ribose is an ideal supplement to take. I play tennis 8-9 times a week, without a day to relax and re-boot. I need to keep my ribose storehouse constantly replenished, so it is an important part of my supplement program.”

Bowden’s helpful tips for getting all-day energy also included limiting processed carbs, which he calls energy drainers, and replacing those foods with more nutritious alternatives such as string cheese with an apple before a workout, and a whey protein shake for post-workout recovery.

He concluded: “When you sleep well, you make smarter nutritional decisions. If you also add D-Ribose into the mix, your tired muscles will recover faster so you can exercise even more. More exercise means sleeping better at night and having more energy throughout the next day. It’s that simple.”

 

Team Ribose’s Billy Demong will represent the U.S. in Sochi

January 14th, 2014
Bill Demong in Bioenergy Ribose tee shirt

Team Ribose member Billy Demong leaves for Sochi, Russia on February 1 to represent the United States in the Olympics. We are proud of his accomplishments and look forward to cheering for him during the Nordic Combined events. Demong has told us that Bioenergy Ribose plays an important role in his stamina and muscle recovery.

Here is the Nordic Combined event schedule. Sochi is nine hours ahead of Eastern Standard Time.

February 12

1:30 p.m. Individual Gundersen NH / 10 km, Competition Round

4:30 p.m. Individual Gundersen NH / 10 km, Cross-Country

February 18

1:30 p.m. Individual Gundersen LH / 10 km, Competition Round

4 p.m. Individual Gundersen LH / 10 km, Cross-Country

February 20

12 p.m. Team Gundersen LH / 4×5 km, Competition Round

3 p.m. Team Gundersen LH / 4×5 km, Cross-Country

While they train hard, the Nordic Combined team members (who will look fantastic in their uniforms!) also like to have fun. We uncovered 10 facts about this team, including the fact that Billy’s dog is his favorite training partner, and that he once dressed as Aquaman after losing a silly bet to fellow team member Taylor Fletcher.

Nordic Combined events include a ski jumping competition and a 10 km cross-country ski race. The Olympics will feature two individual men’s events and a men’s team event. The individual event, also called the Gundersen race, happens in two stages. The first stage is a jump from a large or normal hill. The second stage is a 10 km race. In the first part of the team event, each skier jumps on a large hill; the second event is a 4×5 km cross-country relay. The team whose skier crosses the finish line first is the Nordic Combined winner.

For more on how the events are scored, see the official Sochi 2014 Olympics website.

 

A spoonful here, a sprinkle there: How to add Bioenergy Ribose into your routine

December 23rd, 2013
coffee with spoon

It seems that everyone is looking for the best way to maintain energy and help our muscles recover faster from exertion. As you’re reading this, food and beverage formulators are creating recipes that include ribose for finished products that may soon be on a store shelf near you. They include everything from breads and dairy products to cereals, confections and beverages.

Here’s the good news: You can start adding clinically proven, patent-protected Bioenergy Ribose to some of your favorite foods and beverages today. It’s very versatile. It dissolves easily into almost anything. And it’s slightly sweet without any aftertaste.

We surveyed the Bioenergy Life Science team. Here are some of our favorite ways to use Bioenergy Ribose:

• Stir it into your coffee or tea. For those mornings when you know you’ve got a busy day ahead, this will help you to maintain your energy reserves.

• Sprinkle it on your oatmeal or cold cereal. Unlike table sugar, ribose won’t cause your blood glucose levels to spike and then crash yet maintains your energy throughout the day.

• Blend it into your post-workout smoothie or protein drink. Ribose will help to reduce muscle cramping and soreness so that you have an easier time sticking with your fitness routine.

• Mix it into your yogurt. If you find yourself running out of energy mid-morning or mid-afternoon, ribose plus the protein in yogurt combine to help replenish your reserves.

Look for products from innovative manufacturers who have already begun to incorporate ribose into their functional food formulations.

Team Ribose wishes each of you a healthful, prosperous and vigorous New Year!

 

New study shows ribose plus caffeine may be superior at fighting fatigue.

December 17th, 2013
coffee and snacks

Most people don’t reach for energy drinks unless they are drowsy and have exhausted their energy reserves. Others depend on a candy bar to get them past their mid-afternoon energy slumps. While we know that caffeine, ribose and glucose provide energy benefits, Bioenergy Life Science researchers recently became the first team to test these ingredients using a fatigue model. The goal was to assist product formulators by determining the best possible ingredient synergies. The exciting results may lead to changes in the ingredient ratios used in energy products.

“In previous studies, the effects of these ingredients were evaluated on people under normal conditions,” explained Alex Xue, Ph.D., executive VP & chief technology officer, Bioenergy Life Science. “What made this fatigue model experiment different was that it showed us what happens when you give caffeine and/or ribose to subjects who are already fatigued and have used up their energy reserves. That’s relevant because it is a more real-world example of how these products are used.”

How the study was conducted

For this study, researchers used a standard mice fatigue model. Previous research has shown that ribose and caffeine have similar impacts on mice and humans.

For three days prior to the start of the experiment, mice swam to the point of exhaustion so that their energy reserves were low. During the actual experiment, the mice swam in the morning and afternoon for three days. On the third day, their swimming time dropped more than 20 percent compared to their baseline average over the first two days.

On day four, the mice were fed their normal diet plus one of four treatments. Then their endurance was once again tested by how long they were able to swim. The results:

Glucose only: Swimming time returned to about the same as their normal baseline average (100 percent).

Caffeine only: Swimming time dropped, and became worse than baseline.

Ribose only: Swimming time improved to 135 percent.

50/50 ribose and caffeine combination: Swimming time improved by 150 percent.

“In the second stage, we used different ribose/caffeine concentrations. We determined that the optimal combination – when translated into human equivalents – is 10mg/kg caffeine plus 4 grams of ribose. With this combination, we could boost swimming time to 180 percent! Though this is the optimal combination, it should be noted that lower doses of ribose also improve the swimming time,” says Xue. He added, “When the caffeine concentration was higher, the effect was negative. This could be because we were providing too much stimulant (caffeine) without base energy (ribose) to fill the order. This makes sense because we know that ribose helps the heart to relax, and a relaxed heart can function more efficiently. Caffeine, on the other hand, can make the heart more exhausted because it causes the heart rate to become quick and shallow.” Bioenergy Ribose was used in this experiment.

Xue says that human clinical studies will be conducted to further verify these findings.